Five firms invited to bid for A82 work

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Transport Scotland has published a shortlist of contractors who are in the running to carry out an upgrade on the A82.  

The national transport agency has published its shortlist for the £5.5 million Crianlarich Bypass construction contract and at the same time announced its intention to award a £2 million design contract for the 16 km Tarbet to Inverarnan scheme.

Balfour Beatty, John Paul Construction, RJ McLeod, I&H Brown and Graham Construction are being invited to bid for the Crianlarich Bypass contract, with work expected to start this summer.

In addition, a Halcrow Fairhurst joint venture is to start the Tarbet to Inverarnan design work later this month.

Transport Minister Keith Brown said: “This Government is firmly committed to upgrading the A82, as seen by our recent announcement on the Pulpit Rock works starting later this month.

“Our recognition of the A82 as a vital economic and social lifeline, means, through local consultation, we have developed a programme of road closures that will have less impact on road users, local residents, businesses and visitors.

“Connecting businesses and communities in the Highlands and Islands with the central belt is vital to the area’s future prosperity. That is why we are now taking forward our plans to build a bypass at Crianlarich with five companies invited to bid for this work.

“This investment will benefit local residents with less noise and congestion in the village, whilst road users can avoid the current delays experienced at the junction where the A82 meets the A85.

“We are also planning for the future upgrade of the 16 km section between Tarbet and Inverarnan. The work we are doing along this vital route will lead to improved road safety and journey time reliability and meet the needs of business, communities and visitors alike.”

The Crianlarich Bypass is expected to get underway in summer 2013, with construction lasting approximately 12 months.

The Tarbet to Inverarnan design work is expected to take two years.